Lotus? What lotus? – some rules not only for AD&D

Lotusrauch
For an upcoming German open collaborative campaign, set in Greyhawk’s Wild Coast, we are planning to make heavy use of the lotus rules by Keith Sloan, also featured in Trent Smith’s “Brink of Chaos”, his own Wild Coast interpretation and adventure. For us, the lotus will be less of an imported evil, though, but rather an indigenious growth and traditional product of the region, risen to prominence in recent years, as consumption and thus demand across the Flanaess’ cities begins to skyrocket.

We are also adding the following different qualities of lotus blossoms:

  • Excellent quality – the duration of such blossoms’ effects is increased by +1. All types of lotus can be grown and prepared at excellent quality. Their price is at least double that of the respective typical quality.
  • Poor quality – brown lotus of poor quality has grown stunted or was poorly prepared, has already been chewed once, has been cut with other harmless substances, or is simply a very small dose. Taking a dose of poor quality brown lotus requires a save versus poison, only if this save is failed, will the lotus take effect. The price of a dose is 10 silver.
  • Extremely poor quality – brown lotus of extremely poor quality has grown totally stunted and was very poorly prepared, has already been chewed twice, has been cut with other harmful or poisonous substances, is a minuscle dose, or a combination of any of the above. Taking a dose of extremely poor quality brown lotus requires a save versus poison with a +1 modifier, and only if this save is failed, will the lotus take effect (and even then, the duration will be reduced by -1). Also, taking a dose of extremely poor quality brown lotus may cause disease or parasitic infestation. The price of a dose is 5 silver.

Prices, especially of brown lotus, are highly variable in our Wild Coast. In settlements, where growing, preparing or trading the lotus forms a major part of the economy, prices can be as low as one twentieth, and inhabitants might even be able to provide for their personal need at even lower prices (e.g., by tending some plants for their own consumption or by scoring cast offs from a refining operation). Settlements, whose rulers oppose the lotus trade, however, will see lotus sold at twice or maybe even five times the usual rates.

Also, halflings of our Wild Coast are not immune to the effects of lotus.

PS: Yes, a single dose of brown lotus can be used up to three times – first as a regular dose, then as a – once chewed – poor quality dose, and finally as a – twice chewed – extremely poor quality dose.


Image by yyryyr1030 from Pixabay

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